We speak your language!
What Is...

Translating
Formatting
Localizing
Interpreting
Simultaneous Interpreting
Consecutive Interpreting
Language pair



Translating

Foreign language translating is converting written materials from one language into another.

Back To Top

Localizing

Localizing is the process of adapting a product or service to a particular culture or market in conjunction with translation. In localization, details such as: time zones, units of measurement and money, national holidays, product names, and geographic references must all be considered. Ideally, this is considered during development so that translation is easier. If you need assistance in this area, Accents would be happy to help.

Back To Top

Formatting

Text formatting refers to the electronic layout of a document. It involves setting all the typographic (font, font size, leading ...) and iconographic (graphics, illustrations...) characteristics. Foreign language text formatting aims at mirroring the source document.

Back To Top

Interpreting

Interpreting is the conversion of spoken words from one language to another. There are two types of interpreting: Simultaneous Interpreting and Consecutive Interpreting.

Back To Top

Simultaneous Interpreting

Simultaneous interpreting is used when the person who requires an interpreter is not actively participating in the communication. Example: a President giving a speech. It is called simultaneous interpreting because the interpreter does not wait for the speaker to finish before beginning to interpret into the other language, but rather interprets simultaneously, lagging only a few words behind. Simultaneous interpretation is usually unidirectional, i.e. from language A to language B but not vice-versa..

Back To Top

Consecutive Interpreting

Consecutive interpretation is used when the person requiring the interpreter participates in a two-way communication. The interpreter waits for the person to finish speaking and then gives an interpretation. Consecutive interpreting is usually bidirectional, i.e. from language A to B and vice-versa..

Back To Top

Language pair

A language pair refers to the two languages involved in a translation. These two languages are known as the "source language" and the "target language". The "source language" refers to the language in which the material first appears. The "target language" refers to the language that the material is translated into. For example, in a project being translated from English into Spanish; English is the "source language", Spanish is the "target language".

Back To Top



Accents Navigation Bar - See text links


Services | Pricing | Contact us
About Accents | What Is... | Home